The Scare "Oozevoodoo" CD

$28.00

Oozevoodoo is The Scare's second album. It's the follow-up to 2007's Chivalry. A thrilling, 10-song burst of livewire rock, packed with grit, infused with groove and coated in sleaze, oozevoodoo takes all the frustration, soul-searching and hard yakka of the past few years and rewires it. Since forming on Queensland's Sunshine Coast in 2003, The Scare have partied hard and toured even harder. They've flown around the world by the seat of their pants, survived in the freezing back alleys of Birmingham, England, sleeping on couches or on floors or in gutters. They returned to Australia and released their full-length debut, Chivalry in 2007, only to have it fall largely upon deaf ears, thrusting the group into a period of intense self-scrutiny. Oozevoodoo is the answer to what ails 'em. A quantum leap from Chivalry, it is neither a carbon copy of anyone else, nor a mere pastiche of The Scare's influences. Featuring a heavier attack, simpler rhythms and more ambitious vocal melodies that circumvent the traditional, the lyrics to each song act like mini scenes in a wider epic. The reinvigoration of The Scare also marks the production debut of Silverchair / Dissociatives supremo Daniel Johns. Having formed a special bond after meeting at a mutual friend's studio, Johns invited the group to spend some time at his Newcastle home, which is where the initial seeds for oozevoodoo were sewn. In December 2008, the band and Johns spent 10 days recording at Mangrove Studios on the NSW Central Coast, assisted by well-respected local engineer Chris Townend (Augie March, Art Of Fighting, Portishead). Johns' aim was to help bring out The Scare's essence in terms of both punk attitude and pop aptitude, capturing the new batch of hook-laced tunes in a pure, warts 'n' all fashion. In December last year, the band and Johns spent 10 days recording at Mangrove Studios on the NSW Central Coast, assisted by well-respected local engineer Chris Townend (Augie March, Art Of Fighting, Portishead). Johns' aim was to help bring out The Scare's essence in terms of both punk attitude and pop aptitude, capturing the new batch of hook-laced tunes in a pure, warts 'n' all fashion.

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