Gang Green "You Got It / Older Budweiser" 2xLP

$26.00 $34.00

"You Got It" Gang Green's second full-length release and first for Roadrunner imprint Emergo, "You Got It" did not vary much from the band's long-established musical pattern.

For the "King of Bands," drinking beer (more specifically Budweiser, in keeping with their nickname), skating, and just being a general nuisance are the dominant lyrical themes on You Got It, while an energized hardcore buzzes in accompaniment, making a mockery out of any conceivable speed limit as the Boston punkers sonically graze speed metal.

New fans, unfamiliar with the myopic mookishness of Gang Green, might not have the interest or the patience to enjoy an effort so shamelessly thoughtless, but listeners down with punk's more celebratory, less serious sentiments will certainly get the point.

Band leader Chris Doherty (guitars and lead vocals) punishes his voice and his instrument throughout the onslaught of brew-binging and fret-burning, making You Got It a near-classic skatepunk opus, certainly worthy of a spot in any collection of '80s American hardcore, thrash, or punk.

OLDER... As the album name would suggest, Gang Green was not about to retreat from, or apologize for, the very pro-drinking stance that the Boston band had constantly taken over its long punk tenure -- which had provided the group with the nickname "King of Bands." All the fast-paced odes to partying that fans might expect are present yet again on Older...(Budweiser), with one notable exception.

The track "Ballad" stands out with its orchestrated accompaniment of vocalist Chris Doherty's lyrical brew-worship.

While the theme remains the same, Gang Green takes a musical leap into the great punk rock musical unknown by incorporating violins and other string instruments on the aptly titled cut.

Of course, the intent is to only to deepen the irony (or at least that's what most listeners will assume).

Perhaps the bandmembers became aware of the extremely repetitious nature of their catalog.

But, by dedicating their first musical foray beyond the realm of racket to drinking, they make an assertive philosophical comment that is not only made clear through their consistent lyrical images, but reinforced musically during the remaining 90 percent of their material: There is no such thing as too much of a good thing.

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